Prior Year News Archives:
The final sale of in the disposal of the Thomas Vroom Collection features many works by Emily Kngwarreye including Desert Flowers 1995 (above) estimated at $12,000-18,000, and Kathleen Petyarre – the two artists about which he was most passionate – and many other significant canvases, bark paintings, sculptures, prints and artefacts.
By Richard Brewster on 21-Feb-2017 Exclusive to the AASD

Fourth and final sale of Thomas Vroom Collection.

Over the past 60 years, Europeans and Americans – not Australians - have been in the majority when it comes to significant collections of Aboriginal art.

Chief among them is Dutchman Thomas Vroom, who in the late 1980s first encountered Australian indigenous art in New York.

For the next two decades, he became a passionate collector on an unprecedented level – acquiring important historical works at auction, tracking down and directly acquiring old collections, buying contemporary works on numerous trips to remote regions, from galleries in Australian capital cities and from international dealers.

Highlight of the sale were 12 sculptures in bronze and one in marble by British sculptor John Robinson (1935-2007) which accounted for 11 of the top 15 prices in the sale. Highest price in the sale was for the marble figure 'Danaide', (illustrated) 1985, (after the version by Rodin) which sold for $62,000 against estimates of $15,000-25,000.
By John Furphy on 21-Feb-2017 Exclusive to the AASD

Sleeping figure by British sculptor with Australian connections shines at Mossgreen's Bowral sale

Mossgreen's first New South Wales auction for 2017 was not held in their saleroom in Queen Street Woollahra, but at the Gibraltar Hotel, Bowral, close to the property of the vendor, the late Michael Ball at Sutton Forrest.

Michael Ball was born and educated in Melbourne, but his career with advertising giant Ogilvy & Mather led him live and work in the US, Canada, England, Italy and Asia before retiring to Sutton Forest.

Over his life time he assembled an eclectic collection of furniture, glassware, sculpture, antiquities, tribal artefacts and taxidermy.

Coinciding with British artist David Hockney’s major solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria, Leonard Joel will offer two works by the artist at their auction on Thursday February 16 in their salerooms in South Yarra. 'Sunbather' 1970, (above) carries an estimate of $1,000-$1,500, while 'Parade Metropolitan Opera' 1981 is estimated at $1,200-1,800
By Richard Brewster on 10-Feb-2017 Exclusive to the AASD

Two works by David Hockney to feature in Leonard Joel's first specialist print and photography auction for 2017

British artist David Hockney’s major solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria until March 13 is expected to generate plenty of interest in Leonard Joel’s first specialist print and photography auction for 2017 because two of his works will feature in the sale.

Now 79, Hockney is regarded as one of the most influential living artists and the exhibition features more than 1200 works from the past decade of his career including paintings, digital drawings, photography and video works.

The international guns fired again at Menzies first sale for 2017 in Melbourne, with Fernand Leger’s China Town, 1943, realising $1,875,000 including buyer’s premium. This price sits more than $300,000 shy of its previous realisation in 2015, but is still a bargain by heated international standards.
By Peter James Smith on 10-Feb-2017 Exclusive to the AASD

Menzies closes the ledger on its first sale for 2017 with 82% clearance rate.

Garnishing the full flavour of secondary market cycles Menzies auctioneer Martin Farrah gathered a confident 82% clearance rate from bidders in Melbourne’s fading summer heat for the first major sale of 2017. The international guns fired again with Fernand Leger’s China Town, 1943, (lot 40) realising $1,875,000 including buyer’s premium. (All realised prices quoted include the buyer’s premium.) This price sits more than $300,000 shy of its previous realisation in 2015, but is still a bargain by heated international standards. Menzies February 2017 sale is a tale of firsts and lasts, of re-runs, of a market treading softly towards the upper end, but striding firmly at the lower.

Menzies will hold their first auction for 2017 on 9 February  in their rooms at 1 Darling Street South Yarra, and it will include a work from Danila Vassilieff’s most important period, the Soap Box Derby 1938, which according to Menzies head of Australian art Tim Abdallah, is the artist’s best work to come onto the Australian art auction market. Estimated at $40,000-50,000 it will have to exceed the top estimate to beat the record for a painting by the artist, which stands at $60,000 (hammer).
By Richard Brewster on 06-Feb-2017 Exclusive to the AASD

Usual strong offerings for first Menzies sale of 2017.

Art lovers who visit Stonington mansion in Malvern over the next few days to view paintings earmarked for Menzies forthcoming auction on 9 February, will be struck on entry by the strong colour and highly stylised rendering of modern urban life in French 20th century master Fernand Léger’s 1943 work China Town, which takes pride of place in the foyer.

Australian painting is anything but over-priced if a Canadian painting sold in Toronto for a record price on November 23 is what at first it seems. The painting, Mountain Forms, executed in 1926 by Canadian artist Lawren Harris (1885 – 1970) sold for $C11.2 million at a Heffel’s auction in the former Toronto Stock Exchange Building.
By Terry Ingram on 11-Jan-2017 Exclusive to the AASD

Cold mountain turns Canadian art hot and puts Australian art in the shade

Australian painting is anything but over-priced if a Canadian painting sold in Toronto for a record price on November 23 is what at first it seems.

The painting, Mountain Forms, executed in 1926 by Canadian artist Lawren Harris (1885 – 1970) sold for $C11.2 million at a Heffel’s auction in the former Toronto Stock Exchange Building.

03-Jan-2017

Art Authenticator Peter Paul Biro Loses Appeal in New Yorker Defamation Suit [More holiday reading]

In a closely-watched defamation case, art authenticator Peter Paul Biro has lost his appeal of a case he brought against writer David Grann and New Yorker magazine publisher Condé Nast concerning  that raised questions about Biro’s methodology. Click the following link to read the full New Yorker  2010 article, The Mark of a Masterpiece.

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